Tag Archives: Travel

Signs and Such

This Guy Needs More Bumper Stickers, Baddeck, Nova Scotia
This Guy Needs More Bumper Stickers, Baddeck, Nova Scotia

I like to photograph interesting signs and weird stuff.  Here are a few more from Nova Scotia.

I would change "golfing" to photographing, but that's just me.
I would change “golfing” to photographing, but that’s just me.
Facilities. Burncoat Head Park on the Bay of Fundy, Nova Scotia
Facilities. Burncoat Head Park on the Bay of Fundy, Nova Scotia
Hall's Harbour, Nova Scotia
Hall’s Harbour, Nova Scotia
Lunenburg, Nova Scotia
Lunenburg, Nova Scotia
Make An Offer - Lunenburg, Nova Scotia
Make An Offer – Lunenburg, Nova Scotia
Closed 7:30-ish, Lunenburg, Nova Scotia
Closed 7:30-ish, Lunenburg, Nova Scotia
$10 Charge, Lunenburg, Nova Scotia
$10 Charge, Lunenburg, Nova Scotia
Retired trawler "Cape Sable" on display at the Fisheries Museum
Retired trawler “Cape Sable” on display at the Fisheries Museum
Knock, Knock....  Mahone Bay, Nova Scotia
Knock, Knock…. Mahone Bay, Nova Scotia
Canada...BEER.  Mahone Bay, Nova Scotia
Canada…BEER. Mahone Bay, Nova Scotia
Dr. Weirdbeard, Mahone Bay, Nova Scotia
Dr. Weirdbeard, Mahone Bay, Nova Scotia
Not one, but TWO, Mahone Bay, Nova Scotia
Not one, but TWO, Mahone Bay, Nova Scotia
Ice Cream, Mahone Bay, Nova Scotia
Ice Cream, Mahone Bay, Nova Scotia
Savour The Sea From A Distance, Peggy's Cove, Nova Scotia
Savour The Sea From A Distance, Peggy’s Cove, Nova Scotia
Pedestrians, Peggy's Cove, Nova Scotia
Pedestrians, Peggy’s Cove, Nova Scotia
Seafoam Lavender Farm in Seafoam, Nova Scotia
Seafoam Lavender Farm in Seafoam, Nova Scotia
Bagpiper, Pictou, Nova Scotia
Bagpiper, Pictou, Nova Scotia

People At Work

Moving a very heavy mill stone made somewhat easier with the use of a crane.  Balmoral Grist Mill Museum in Balmoral Mills, Nova Scotia
Moving a very heavy mill stone made somewhat easier with the use of a crane. Balmoral Grist Mill Museum in Balmoral Mills, Nova Scotia

More photos from Nova Scotia….

I sort of half inadvertently developed a series of photographs of people working.  Some more interesting than others, but all with a story or two to tell.

Moving a very heavy mill stone made somewhat easier with the use of a crane.  Balmoral Grist Mill Museum in Balmoral Mills, Nova Scotia
Moving a very heavy mill stone made somewhat easier with the use of a crane. Balmoral Grist Mill Museum in Balmoral Mills, Nova Scotia
Worker repairing a scallop drag, or net, Lunenburg, Nova Scotia
Worker repairing a scallop drag, or net, Lunenburg, Nova Scotia
Pouring samples for a tasting. The Glenora Inn and Distillery, Glenville, Nova Scotia
Cassie & Maggie, Celtic duo performing in Lunenburg, Nova Scotia
Cassie & Maggie, Celtic duo performing in Lunenburg, Nova Scotia
Retired Captain Hanlon aboard the retired trawler "Cape Sable" on display at the Fisheries Museum of the Atlantic, Lunenburg, Nova Scotia
Retired Captain Hanlon aboard the retired trawler “Cape Sable” on display at the Fisheries Museum of the Atlantic, Lunenburg, Nova Scotia
Horse-drawn carriage tours were a popular form of sightseeing in Lunenburg, Nova Scotia
Horse-drawn carriage tours were a popular form of sightseeing in Lunenburg, Nova Scotia
Captain John Bryson from our sailing cruise aboard the Amoeba on Bras d'Or Lake, Baddeck, Nova Scotia
Captain John Bryson from our sailing cruise aboard the Amoeba on Bras d’Or Lake, Baddeck, Nova Scotia
In this family, everyone does their part.  Neil's Harbour, Nova Scotia
In this family, everyone does their part. Neil’s Harbour, Nova Scotia
Fresh prosciotto at Luckett Vineyard near Grand Pre Nova Scotia
Fresh prosciotto at Luckett Vineyard near Grand Pre Nova Scotia
Our captain watches for whales and other boats, aboard our whale watching cruise with Pirate's Cove Whale Cruises
Our captain watches for whales and other boats, aboard our whale watching cruise with Pirate’s Cove Whale Cruises
Tour guide at the Glenora Inn and Distillery, Glenville, Nova Scotia
Tour guide at the Glenora Inn and Distillery, Glenville, Nova Scotia

 

Shadows, Textures and Details

Lunenburg, Nova Scotia
Lunenburg, Nova Scotia

I’ve been running through my Nova Scotia photos looking for themes.  One of the things I typically look for when wandering through a town are little details.  These are a few that I took while we were in Lunenburg.  Most of them were taken on the way to or from breakfast or dinner.  See, photography and dining don’t have to be mutually exclusive! 🙂

Lunenburg, Nova Scotia
Lunenburg, Nova Scotia
Lunenburg, Nova Scotia
Lunenburg, Nova Scotia
Lunenburg, Nova Scotia
Lunenburg, Nova Scotia
Lunenburg, Nova Scotia
Lunenburg, Nova Scotia
Lunenburg, Nova Scotia
Lunenburg, Nova Scotia
Lunenburg, Nova Scotia
Lunenburg, Nova Scotia
Lunenburg, Nova Scotia
Lunenburg, Nova Scotia
Lunenburg, Nova Scotia
Lunenburg, Nova Scotia

Weekend At The Beach

Sunrise on the Beach, Hilton Head Island, South Carolina
Sunrise on the Beach, Hilton Head Island, South Carolina

When Kathy & I want to really get away and relax, our favorite destination is the beach.  And when we want to go to the beach, our favorite beach is Hilton Head Island, SC.  We spent Labor Day Weekend there.  With our house project rapidly nearing completion, and all the stuff that goes along with that, we knew that this would probably be the Last Hurrah for us for this year.  I’ve used up just about all of my vacation time, and we’ve used up just about all of our vacation money, and what little we have left will probably be earmarked for furniture and stuff.  It’s amazing how a new house tends to make all of your furniture obsolete!

Sunrise on the Beach, Hilton Head Island, South Carolina
Sunrise on the Beach, Hilton Head Island, South Carolina

I’ve taken some of my favorite photographs at Hilton Head, but after a while it gets a little tough to do something new.  So I mostly stick to the tried and true and hope for some inspiration along the way.  I typically like to shoot when the tide is out, as I can frequently find some sand textures and pools that add some interest.  This time, it seemed that sunrise and sunset generally coincided with high tide, so I was left with fewer options.  That, combined with an overriding need for sleep kept me in the bed for all mornings but one.  And I did manage to get out one evening, which was a nice departure, as we usually head out for dinner just about the time the light is getting nice.  So, with one sunrise and one sunset to work with, I don’t think I got anything I’ll be hanging on the wall, but it felt good to get out when I did.

Sunset on the Beach, Hilton Head Island, South Carolina
Sunset on the Beach, Hilton Head Island, South Carolina

I’m still putting the old 5D through its paces, and am convinced that it is working just fine.  I just wanted to be as sure as I could be before I put it back in the pack in a backup role.  The biggest surprise for me was how quickly I got dust on the sensor!  With the automagical dust removal system of the newer Mark III I never have to worry about dust.  But the combination of small apertures and no sensor cleaning means I’ll need to pay a little more attention.

Sunrise on the Beach, Hilton Head Island, South Carolina
Sunrise on the Beach, Hilton Head Island, South Carolina

I’m still working on Nova Scotia photos, too.  So I’ll have a few things to post about coming up, even though my adventures may be on hiatus for a little while!

Sunrise on the Beach, Hilton Head Island, South Carolina
Sunrise on the Beach, Hilton Head Island, South Carolina

September Wallpaper

Blue Rocks, Nova Scotia
Blue Rocks, Nova Scotia

Tired of Nova Scotia photos yet?  Good,  ’cause I’m not!

Another photo from our July adventure, the light is what I think makes this photo. The boarded up windows on one side and the hint of color in the other window hint at possibly a difficult past with some hope for  the future.

We saw a lot of buildings with this shake siding, much of it in need of a coat of paint. Probably very durable against the elements despite occasional deferred maintenance.

I hope everyone has an excellent September.

Good As New

Shelton Vineyards, Dobson, North Carolina
Shelton Vineyards, Dobson, North Carolina

I got my camera back from the shop last week and had a chance to test it out over the weekend.  Kathy & I visited Shelton Vineyards with some of our nature photography buddies.  As far as I can tell it looks like the machine is functioning properly.  The operator felt a little rusty but I got the hang of it pretty quickly.

More photos than words today, so enjoy!

Shelton Vineyards, Dobson, North Carolina
Shelton Vineyards, Dobson, North Carolina
Shelton Vineyards, Dobson, North Carolina
Shelton Vineyards, Dobson, North Carolina
Shelton Vineyards, Dobson, North Carolina
Shelton Vineyards, Dobson, North Carolina

The Dory Shop

Color version that I'm pretty happy with. Lunenburg, Nova Scotia
Color version that I’m pretty happy with. Lunenburg, Nova Scotia

I’m still not convinced that this is the successful photograph I thought it would be when I made the frames, but I’ve enjoyed working on this one.  I originally envisioned a high-contrast, low-saturation photo and thought it might work in monochrome, but (a) I think I’ll always be a color sort of guy, (b) I never did get the hang of what a black & white photo is “supposed” to look like, and (c) I might not be working on a good enough example.  Hard to say.

Black & white version that I think looks pretty close to what I visualized.
Black & white version that I think looks pretty close to what I visualized.

I think it’s a pretty interesting scene.  It’s a little cluttered, but I feel it has good balance and good light.  In the post sunset twilight I was trying to capture an old-timey look that would suggest a vintage photograph, although not necessarily black & white, rather than one taken with a new-fangled digital camera.

My mostly unadjusted original.
My mostly unadjusted original.

 

Buoy, That Was Fun!

Neil's Harbour, Nova Scotia
Mmmmm, Red!

Sorry, I couldn’t resist the pun.  Besides, it gives me a great excuse to show photos of…buoys!

More Buoys, No Gulls
More Buoys, No Gulls (Sick, Huh?) Neil’s Harbour, Nova Scotia

 

I’m processing photos as I find ones that interest me.  Sometimes I have words to go with them, and sometimes I don’t.

We saw very few wooden lobster traps still in use.  Most of the wooden ones we saw were along the roadside for sale to tourists.  Neil's Harbour, Nova Scotia
We saw very few wooden lobster traps still in use. Most of the wooden ones we saw were along the roadside for sale to tourists. Neil’s Harbour, Nova Scotia

These are really cliche, of course.  But when you see them you still have to shoot them.  I think there is rule about that.

Kathy's Photo - The more common wire lobster traps.  These were everywhere.
Kathy’s Photo – The more common wire lobster traps. These were everywhere.

I’ve found some photos that are going to require my time and attention to get the look I have in mind, so in the mean time, here are a few Velvia-like photos of fishing stuff.  I hope you enjoy them!

Yellow.  With a misfit!
Yellow. With a misfit!
Oh, and there were ropes!
Oh, and there were ropes!
More red!
More red!

 

 

The Broken Camera Story

Old 5D before the mirror fell off
Old 5D before the mirror fell off

I mentioned in an earlier post about having broken my camera while in Nova Scotia.  Here’s the story.

We were driving around the Grand Pre’ valley late one afternoon, doing some sightseeing in the beautiful light that was so common there.  Driving down a country road, Kathy – the eagle-eyed eagle spotter – spotted this bald eagle perched atop a telephone pole.  I slowed way down to see if I could get a place to pull off, but there were ditches on both sides of the road, and the road was lined with rows of corn, so there was not a lot of choice.

Fortunately, I chanced upon a tractor path that I was able to back into, which gave Bill on the passenger side of the van a good shot out the window.  My camera, of course, was in the back of the van.  Keeping the van between me and the eagle, I was able to work my way around the back, open the door without causing too much of a fuss, and assemble my 70-200 and 2X teleconverter.  He was still a long way off, but that was all I had.

5D Mark III after swapping cameras
5D Mark III after swapping cameras

I’m not sure why I decided to put my old 5D on this lens setup.  I was probably thinking that I didn’t need to use 22 megapixels on what would probably amount to a bunch of sleepy eagle photos, and that 12 megapixels would be plenty.  I just don’t remember.  So, by my count I had taken 34 sleepy eagle photos, he was just sitting there, posing and looking cool.  He would occasionally turn his head to one side or another, but that was about it.  Zzzzzz….

Who turned out the lights? This frame is when the mirror fell of
Who turned out the lights? This frame is when the mirror fell of

On the 35th frame, the camera made a strange clunking sound.  It sounded like the shutter was still open, since I didn’t hear the mirror return to its usual position.  The camera sounded like I had used mirror lockup, just a lot louder.  I turned the camera off, and the mirror – or at least the mirror mechanism – finally came back down.  Looking through the viewfinder it was immediately apparent what happened, but I wasn’t exactly sure why or what was going to happen next.  The mirror had become separated from the mirror-holder-thingie that it attaches to.

The eagle took pity on me and gave me time to swap camera bodies
The eagle took pity on me and gave me time to swap camera bodies

Kathy and our friends up front were still marveling at the eagle and our amazing fortune to find it with such a great place to watch, and I was standing in back of the van saying, “umm, guys?  My camera just broke.”  Fortunately I had the presence of mind to pull off the old body and put my new one on.  Of course all the time I knew the eagle was going to fly off while I didn’t have a working camera in my hands.  Fortunately, he was kind enough to wait for me, and allowed me to get another dozen or so shots off before he flew off.  And I got a couple of decent flight photos.  No prize-winners, but considering the circumstances, not too shabby.

The eagle took pity on me and gave me time to swap camera bodies
The eagle took pity on me and gave me time to swap camera bodies

After I returned home, I packaged the camera up and sent it off to Canon Professional Services for evaluation.  A few days later I received an e-mail stating that they are going to repair the camera at no charge, calling it an “in-warranty repair.”  A friend of mine asked me if it was covered for a period of time or a number of shutter actuations.  I told him that it was covered under an “ain’t suppose to happen” warranty.  I’m still waiting for it to come back, but I expect it shortly.

So that’s the story of the broken camera.  Hopefully there will be a happy ending in a few days.

The eagle took pity on me and gave me time to swap camera bodies
The eagle took pity on me and gave me time to swap camera bodies

More About Balance

Hall's Harbour, Nova Scotia
Hall’s Harbour, Nova Scotia

There were a number of good and thoughtful comments to my previous post about balance.  Some of them related to the visual balance of photography, but mostly the comments seemed to revolve around the time balance involved in making time for photography, and to a lesser extent about time balance in our lives in general.  I find myself more and more preferring to photograph as a part of traveling or doing other things, as opposed to making photography the central purpose of my activity.  There is a subtle but important distinction between the two.  Mostly it just means a change in subject matter, but because I’m photographing things that attract me or grab my attention as I go, I’m more likely to photograph things that have more interest or meaning to me, rather than just going down a checklist or conforming to some predetermined agenda or formula.

(Kathy's Photo) Cunard House in Pictou, Nova Scotia
(Kathy’s Photo) Cunard House in Pictou, Nova Scotia

Cedric’s comment was perhaps the most interesting to me, because he read my words in the context of the accompanying photographs, which were more of a “centered” type of composition.  Relating it to his personal preference for photos that are “grossly one sided across the vertical” he said that he rarely shares that type of photograph, “because generally they are not popular and sometimes rattle people too much.”

My reaction when reading those words was “why does “balanced” have to be “centered?””  If your vision (or your preference) results in a photograph that has the subject off to one side and it pleases you and suits your intention, isn’t that OK?  Balance should be dictated by what works for us in a particular situation and what feels right to us.  In most cases that might mean a result that is closer to the center than to the edge, but it doesn’t have to.

The Glenora Inn and Distillery, Glenville, Nova Scotia
The Glenora Inn and Distillery, Glenville, Nova Scotia

Mark’s comments focused on the parallels between visual and time balance, and the fact that he feels that he has more control over the photographic part than the time part.  I agree, as there are more outside demands on our time than there are on our photographic vision.  I probably would have been perfectly willing to get up at 4am for sunrise a few days, were it not for the fact that our days didn’t leave room for catching up on lost sleep, that daylight went until sunset at 9:00 and that I didn’t want to go home from vacation needing a vacation!  It was a lot easier to convince my traveling companions to head out for sunset than to get up for sunrise, so it was an accommodation I was more than willing to make, even if it meant completely forgoing sunrise.

"Adopt a Lobster" Pictou, Nova Scotia
“Adopt a Lobster” Pictou, Nova Scotia

Paul’s comment referenced my decision to leave the laptop at home, stating that he often does the same when I he travels.  He said that he sometimes goes so far as to leave the camera at home, preferring to remove the “self-pressure to get out and photograph and carve out that time to do it.”  I’ve found that, too.  Sometimes I just want to go and watch, to experience whatever it is I’m doing for what it is.  I don’t need to capture it with a camera if I see it, experience it and remember it.  There is a time and place for the camera, and there is a time and place to just watch.

Hooked - Hall's Harbour, Nova Scotia
Hooked – Hall’s Harbour, Nova Scotia

As it relates to photographic composition, I’m convinced that “balance” doesn’t have to mean “middle.”  I’d love to see some of Cedric’s “unbalanced-balanced” photographs.  I’ll bet we would love them, mostly because they would reflect his vision and are made from his heart.  On the subject of time, some of us choose and are able to spend all of our waking hours doing photography.  That’s great.  If others of us are only able to carve out a few hours a day or a week for our photography, that’s just the other end of the continuum and is OK, too.  When I’m faced with a choice between a nice dinner with my sweetie and a possible sunset opportunity, more often than not I’m going to choose the nice dinner.  Except for those rare times of the year when I can do both!  Several of us have given up television in exchange for more time doing other things.  If that’s a decision that works for us, then that’s OK.  If I post dozens of photos a day to my blog or Facebook while Paul leaves the computer at home and each choice works for us, that’s cool.

Waiting for The Tide, Hall's Harbour, Nova Scotia
Waiting for The Tide, Hall’s Harbour, Nova Scotia

I think the main lesson in all of this discussion and conversation is that balance means different things to each of us.  What is balanced to me may be nothing but tension for someone else.  And what someone else finds comfortable might be like chaos for me.  And you know what?  That’s part of what makes this life so wonderful!  Each of us has our own take on what works, for the most part we have the ability and the means to express it, and in the end what matters is that what we do makes us happy.  If we are able to share our work and make a few other people smile in the process, that is just gravy!

The Glenora Inn and Distillery, Glenville, Nova Scotia
The Glenora Inn and Distillery, Glenville, Nova Scotia