Tag Archives: Travel

March 2014 Wallpaper

Tree and brick wall, Charleston, South Carolina
Tree and brick wall, Charleston, South Carolina

I’m going to try something a little different starting with this month’s calendar.  For the last year or so I’ve been mostly dredging up old landscape photos mixed in with a few more recent shots.  I’ve recently started to realize how much my photographic emphasis has changed over the last few years, and I find myself photographing a lot less nature and a lot more of what I call “found scenes.”  Sometimes they are scenes I find in nature, but often they are scenes I come across just walking down the street in some town I happen to be visiting.

These photos won’t necessarily be the iconic “hero shots” that I have been posting as wallpaper, but I feel like I need to be true to my own sense of what it is I happen to be seeing and shooting.  And that changes, necessarily I think, over time as I learn and grow.  Some readers may enjoy this work and others may not.  For those who like it, please say so and thanks.  For those who don’t, please feel free to let me know!

I may also add in a few abstract photos that I’ve come to enjoy.  Those also make nice wallpaper, although they may be a little different from what I’ve posted here in the past.

This particular photo was taken in Charleston, South Carolina, last winter.  For me it represents the change from winter to spring – winter from the bare branches on the trees, but spring through the green on the bricks in the background, set against a whitewashed wall that hints of color but also could be seen as representing snow.  Not in Charleston probably, but certainly in many parts of this country, even in March.

I hope everyone enjoys this little change of pace and I hope everyone has a nice March!

Wine on Tuesdays

Abandoned house along SR 264 near Englehard, North Carolina
Abandoned house along SR 264 near Englehard, North Carolina

Kathy & I have worked really hard in recent years to strike a balance between planning & preparing for the future and living a full & meaningful life in the present.  A concept that we recently came up with was the idea that we should make it a point to “Celebrate Every Day.”  It’s probably a product of age and maturity, possibly wisdom, but starting from the loss of my own parents nearly 30 years ago and continuing as recently as the loss of Kathy’s parents last year, we have made a point of evaluating our own priorities in this context.  We finally gave it a formal name just recently.

One night last week – Tuesday, in fact – we decided to have one of our more “splurgy” bottles of wine.  We often save those for what we might consider special occasions.  But in keeping with our “Celebrate Every Day” theme, we decided to open that bottle “because it was Tuesday.”  Thus was born the idea of Wine on Tuesdays.  Any other day of the week would be appropriate as well. 🙂

Abandoned house along SR 264 near Englehard, North Carolina
Abandoned house along SR 264 near Englehard, North Carolina

But, It’s On Sale!

Graveyard behind the Unitarian Church, Charleston, South Carolina
Graveyard behind the Unitarian Church, Charleston, South Carolina

This post has been rolling around in my head for some time, but Thanksgiving and all the Black Friday hoopla seems to be an appropriate time to gather these thoughts and put them out on the blog.

On our recent journey to Charleston, I remember at one point commenting about the number of car dealerships clustered around a particular interchange.  I think it was somewhere around Columbia, SC but it could be anywhere in the US big enough to have car dealerships.  As much as I love and appreciate nice cars, the automobile business has always served to me as a prime representation of marketing-driven consumption.  If I wanted to be negative I could say “greed and excess” here, but it wouldn’t serve my point.  So we’ll call it marketing-driven consumption.  Black Friday is another prime example of marketing-driven consumption to the max.

Graveyard behind the Unitarian Church, Charleston, South Carolina
Graveyard behind the Unitarian Church, Charleston, South Carolina

I specifically remember, shortly after buying a new car several years ago, someone told me “congratulations!” as if to imply that purchasing a new car was some kind of heroic achievement.  But that’s how cars have always been marketed, as symbols of success and status.  When I was growing up, each September my brother & I would start sneaking into the storage lots behind the local car dealerships to get a peek at the new models to be introduced in the fall.  Back in that day, models tended to really change between model years, rather than just another homogenized ToyHoNisOlet, because the manufacturers relied more on the cars to sell themselves. And they all had somewhat distinctive features, from styling to performance.

Today, many cars, at least those the regular folks can afford, all look pretty much alike.  So it takes marketing to make us want one over another.  And that marketing is usually aimed at making someone feel young, attractive, successful, more interesting or some attribute only accomplished by purchasing a particular product.  Because it’s been hammered into our heads for so long, whenever someone sees a friend driving a new car, there is often a tinge of envy (or worse) and at least a little bit of “must be nice.”  I usually look at it and think of what I could do with the payment.  But that’s just me.

Graveyard behind the Unitarian Church, Charleston, South Carolina
Graveyard behind the Unitarian Church, Charleston, South Carolina

Anyway, the comment that I made when I saw all of these car dealerships was that if there was some way we could be identified and ranked (because after all this is all about judging and ranking – a subject for another post) not by how fancy our car is or the neighborhood we live in, but by the size of our 401(k) our IRA or our savings account, would there be investment offices at all of these interchanges instead of car dealerships?  Would we make different decisions if they were based on mindful reasoning instead of marketing?  And how would those decisions be reflected in our personal wellbeing if they didn’t involve spending huge sums of money or committing to an endless stream of payments?

Graveyard behind the Unitarian Church, Charleston, South Carolina
Graveyard behind the Unitarian Church, Charleston, South Carolina

In that same vein, why do so many people tend to judge how serious someone is about photography based on the type of equipment they own or the subject matter that they photograph?  Have we been convinced by marketing and promotion by the camera manufacturers and retailers that the only way to take meaningful photographs is to have the latest and greatest camera and lens?  Perhaps.  But I prefer to appreciate a photographer’s work based on the quality of their photographs, and when possible the stories behind the photographs.  THAT is what photography means to me, not what brand of camera someone has, or which lens or how big their sensor is.  Or even whether they are using a digital camera or film.  But that’s hard, just like resisting the temptation brought on by advertising and marketing is hard.

Graveyard behind the Unitarian Church, Charleston, South Carolina
Graveyard behind the Unitarian Church, Charleston, South Carolina

As someone who doesn’t own a television or listen to commercial radio (I usually say that “I don’t watch TV” because saying “I don’t own a TV” makes some people uncomfortable) I’m not bombarded by all of the marketing messages that drive consumer spending.  Kathy & I just don’t buy a lot of stuff, and when we do, we buy it because we need or want it.  Being on sale isn’t generally a factor in our buying decision, although once we make a decision to purchase something we will often wait on a sale to buy it if we aren’t in a rush.  But I still find myself attracted by the “Sale” or “Limited Time Only” mentality, and sometimes have to work hard to curb that feeling I get when something looks attractive because I’m afraid that I might not be able to have it.

Graveyard behind the Unitarian Church, Charleston, South Carolina
Graveyard behind the Unitarian Church, Charleston, South Carolina

As Kathy & I prepare to move into our “downsized” new home, and after having lived for the last 6 months in a rented apartment with just our most essential belongings, we have come to realize that all of the things we have been storing since May are things that aren’t really necessary for our daily lives.  And while we did a really good job of paring down the things that we deemed “disposable” before we moved, we now think that maybe we didn’t go far enough.  Many of things we have been storing are things that we’re going to have to think really hard about, in order to decide how much of it we even need or want to keep.

Graveyard behind the Unitarian Church, Charleston, South Carolina
Graveyard behind the Unitarian Church, Charleston, South Carolina

So what does this all have to do with anything?  In the last few days, like many of us I’ve been bombarded by e-mails from every merchant I’ve ever done business with promoting their Black Friday “Doorbusters.”  I don’t know about everyone else, but I haven’t yet seen a “deal” on anything I’d actually buy.  I don’t think of camera equipment as something that is an impulse purchase.  Most people only buy a camera when they need one, after weeks or sometimes months of analysis or research.  I’ve enjoyed several recent exchanges on the blogs of some of my photo friends, discussing things like the aesthetics of a particular camera.  Talking about how a camera feels to hold versus another, the ease of use or feel of the controls.  Discussions around the mindfulness of talking photographs and cutting out the noise and chatter that distracts us from the pursuit of activities that make us happy.  Things that matter to those of us who actually use a camera to take photographs, not just collect equipment or are constantly chasing after the next great thing.  But that isn’t stuff you can buy at the mall or Best Buy.

Graveyard behind the Unitarian Church, Charleston, South Carolina
Graveyard behind the Unitarian Church, Charleston, South Carolina

Monte has demonstrated that you don’t need to necessarily buy the latest version of a camera, that the introduction of a new model can mean a good deal on the previous one.  That makes the older model a good value, because it will do exactly what he needs it to do for a fraction of the cost of when it was new, or of the cost of the new model.

Chris has spent some time comparing the relative qualities of several mirrorless compact camera models, and has formed an opinion that seems to be contrary to the popular opinion.  But if a particular camera meets your needs, then it is the right tool for you.  Whether or not something is on sale doesn’t make it a good deal if it isn’t what you want.  And I guess that is my point.

And Cedric wrote a similar post about how the ergonomics and feel of a camera means more to him than megapixels and dynamic range.  His story about an exchange with a photography professor about the “feel” of a camera was a good one.

Mindfulness is a theme I have been pursuing lately.  Decisions made in a calculated fashion, not driven by a marketing frenzy.  Just being on sale isn’t a reason to buy anything we don’t want or need.  Not buying something means you have saved the entire price, not just a percentage.  And not needing a place to store all of our accumulated junk means we have room and resources for things that do matter to us.  A purchasing decision made mindfully is a good one regardless of the price of the item being purchased.

I’m looking forward to living even more mindfully in 2014.  We’ll see how that actually plays out.  But first I’m going to have to sort through all the stuff that the movers are going to deliver in a couple of weeks!  I’ll probably decide to start planning a vacation…that’s a lot more fun than a car payment.

Graveyard behind the Unitarian Church, Charleston, South Carolina
Graveyard behind the Unitarian Church, Charleston, South Carolina

Charleston, Revisited

Brides to Be, Charleston, South Carolina
Brides to Be, Charleston, South Carolina

Kathy & I spent some time in Charleston, SC a few weekends ago.  I took a few photos, and these are a few that show my take on Charleston, although perhaps not what most tourists take photos of.  I got a few of those, too.  That will be the topic for some future posts.  For now, here are a few of my “non-typical” Charleston photos.

Line 'Em Up, Charleston, South Carolina
Line ‘Em Up, Charleston, South Carolina
For The Birds, Charleston, South Carolina
For The Birds, Charleston, South Carolina
Dart, Charleston, South Carolina
Dart, Charleston, South Carolina
Extended Absence, Charleston, South Carolina
Extended Absence, Charleston, South Carolina
Post No Bills, Charleston, South Carolina
Post No Bills, Charleston, South Carolina
Watch Where You Sit, Charleston, South Carolina
Watch Where You Sit, Charleston, South Carolina
Service Entrance, Charleston, South Carolina
Service Entrance, Charleston, South Carolina
Vinally!  Charleston, South Carolina
Vinally! Charleston, South Carolina
Pick A Bike, College of Charleston, Charleston, South Carolina
Pick A Bike, College of Charleston, Charleston, South Carolina

 

Peggy’s Cove

Peggy's Cove Lighthouse, Peggy,s Cove, Nova Scotia
Peggy’s Cove Lighthouse, Peggy,s Cove, Nova Scotia

I’m still working on Nova Scotia photos…hoping to come up with 12 that are calendar-worthy. Not that I don’t think I can find 12, I just don’t want to find the perfect one after it’s too late!

Peggy's Cove, Nova Scotia
Peggy’s Cove, Nova Scotia

Peggy’s Cove, Nova Scotia is a real tourist destination, and for good reason.  It’s a beautiful location, has a little history, it’s got a lighthouse, a bunch of boats and a quaint little harbor.  The day we were there is was relatively uncrowded and the weather was beautiful.  And even in the middle of the day, the light was fantastic.

Peggy's Cove, Nova Scotia
Peggy’s Cove, Nova Scotia

The biggest challenge for me in photographing a place like this is deciding whether I want people in my shots or not.  I like people just fine, but I don’t always want to include them in my photos of a quintessential maritime fishing village!  Sometimes I just need to be patient, and other times I just need to accept that there will be people! 🙂

Peggy's Cove, Nova Scotia
Peggy’s Cove, Nova Scotia

Another thing that works well is to photograph someplace that people are less likely to be, like the edge of a dock.  Most people don’t like to spend time in the water in places like this.

Peggy's Cove, Nova Scotia
Peggy’s Cove, Nova Scotia

And they don’t let people climb the lighthouse, inside or out. 

Peggy's Cove Lighthouse, Peggy,s Cove, Nova Scotia
Peggy’s Cove Lighthouse, Peggy,s Cove, Nova Scotia

 Nobody cares about old boats laying in a field. 

Peggy's Cove, Nova Scotia
Peggy’s Cove, Nova Scotia

 I had to wait on this one.

Peggy's Cove, Nova Scotia
Peggy’s Cove, Nova Scotia

 And another one from where the people don’t go.

Peggy's Cove, Nova Scotia
Peggy’s Cove, Nova Scotia

 

 

A Question of Style

 

Sunset at Cowee Mountains Overlook, Blue Ridge Parkway MP 430
Sunset at Cowee Mountains Overlook, Blue Ridge Parkway MP 430

Generally when I am in the process of taking a photograph, I have a basic idea what it is going to look like when I am finished processing it.  When I’m sitting at the computer working on an image, it just sort of “develops itself.”  Most of the time the direction I need to go with an becomes pretty clear to me. I open up an image in Lightroom, work on it a bit, and after a few basic tweaks it is pretty much done.  Unless I’m going to make a print, there isn’t a whole lot more I do.

This particular photograph has me a little perplexed. I processed it exactly how I expected to. It’s a little more processed than usual, but there’s quite a lot of dynamic range going on here. But for some reason, I just can’t seem to get comfortable with it.  There’s nothing really “wrong” with it, in fact a lot of people would probably wish that they had taken it themselves.  But for some reason I am struggling with it.

It’s a typical Cowee Mountains Overlook sunset.  It’s got a nice sky, detail in the foreground, and there’s a lot going on.  Too much, I think.  It is a very “busy” image, as opposed to a lot of my photographs that are a bit more simplified.  I’ve definitely processed it a lot more than I usually process an image.  Maybe that’s it, I’m not sure.

I think the thing that I keep coming back to is that it doesn’t seem like it’s mine.  It’s the sort of landscape photograph that I’ve taken for years, but I just can’t seem to connect with this one. No, I didn’t switch memory cards with someone by mistake, but it’s just such a departure from the type of photography I’ve been doing recently that I may just have to spend some time with it to figure it out.  In the mean time, it just doesn’t feel like my style, and I find that interesting.

The Importance of Good Light

Another copy of the same photo used in the monthly wallpaper and my printed calendar.
Another copy of the same photo used in the monthly wallpaper and my printed calendar.

I have received a number of compliments on the photo from my last post and for the same photo that is on this month’s print calendar.  This truly is a wonderful photograph, one of my all-time favorites.  This is a location I have visited a number of times, at different times of the year and in varying conditions.  The particular evening that I made the photograph that became this month’s calendar, I had exceptionally nice light.  It only lasted for a few moments, but that light, combined with very still water, made for just the right conditions.

The same location in really good, but not spectacular, light.
The same location in really good, but not spectacular, light.

I remembered a similar photograph that I had taken at this same location several years earlier, and went back and pulled it up.  While nice in it’s own way, it was a more cloudy afternoon and the light is much more subdued.  The lighting was much more subdued, which is what I would typically favor for a lot of the photography I do.  It is still a very nice photograph, but not on the same level as the later one.

Another photo taken the same evening as the first one.  A little more water movement, but similar light.
Another photo taken the same evening as the first one. A little more water movement, but similar light.

It is a good example of why we return often to a familiar location.  Because you just don’t know what conditions you might encounter.

November 2013 Wallpaper

Boat Reflections on Far Creek, Englehard, North Carolina
Boat Reflections on Far Creek, Englehard, North Carolina

OK, so I’m a little late this month – SORRY!  Actually I sort of forgot.  But at least ONE person contacted me to tell me that they missed my update.  Sorry, Kevin W, that you had to go almost a whole day without the latest calendar! 🙂

Lots happening in the House of Dills this month.  Hopefully I’ll be broadcasting from my new “studio” for the December update.  We’ll see.  I’ve got some posts in the works, though.  Words for some, photos for others.  I just have to put them together.

For those of you who also have my print calendar, this is one of the few times that I’ve duplicated my print calendar with my desktop calendar.  But when I turned the page on my printed calendar this morning, I liked the photo so much I decided to put it on my computer screen, too!  I hope you enjoy it.

Time and Commitment

Sunset at Cowee Mountains Overlook, Blue Ridge Parkway MP 430
Sunset at Cowee Mountains Overlook, Blue Ridge Parkway MP 430

I’ve written lately about how I feel like I am in a bit of a slump, photographically.  Many readers have made comments along the lines of “gee, I’d love to have a slump like that.”  But I’ve recently come to realize what I mean by what I’ve written.  What I’ve pretty much decided is that doing the kind of photography I like to do requires an investment of time, energy and dedication that, for a number of reasons, I just haven’t been committing to this year.  And this applies not just to the shooting, but to the processing and printing parts of the process as well.

As much as I’d like to think I can, I can’t just show up at a place and take meaningful photographs.  I can take photographs for sure, and many of them may be good technically.  But to create photographs with meaning requires more time.  I need to get to a place, get my mind and my heart tuned in to what is happening, and sometimes just sit for a while until I start hearing the voices.  “Being open to the gifts” is what my friend Les Saucier likes to say.  I can’t just pull the magic out of my camera bag, toss it out there and expect to take meaningful photographs.

Sunset at Caney Fork Overlook on the Blue Ridge Parkway MP 428
Sunset at Caney Fork Overlook on the Blue Ridge Parkway MP 428

Mostly what this requires is an investment of time.  Time partly to allow things to happen, but also time to get to a place in plenty of time for whatever is happening.  Sunsets are a good example.  I can’t just show up at a spot 10 minutes before sunset, pull out the camera and start taking amazing photos.  Sometimes the best photos come well before the actual setting of the sun, sometimes as much as an hour before, such as when the sun is moving behind a low-lying layer of clouds and casting sunbeams, or highlighting ridgelines as they recede into the distance.  Often by the time the sun sets all the magic is gone.  Occasionally, the magic is just beginning at sunset, as the real color begins to appear after the sun has gone below the horizon.  But I need time to “tune in,” to see what is happening, and to figure out what to shoot and how to shoot it.

Fall color along the Blue Ridge Parkway near Waterrock Knob
Fall color along the Blue Ridge Parkway near Waterrock Knob

The other way that my photography requires an investment of time is in having plenty of time to enjoy myself.  Kathy & I enjoy good meals at nice restaurants, both at home and when we travel.  That generally doesn’t involve sitting at an overlook with cold chicken and potato salad.  Sometimes it does, but not usually.  So in order to do a little bit of both, it’s often necessary to have more than just 24 hours in a place in order to really do it justice and to find that balance between sunset on the Parkway and dinner in Waynesville (or wherever).  One of the ways that this year has differed from previous years is that we have been taking more 2-day weekends and fewer 3 or 4-day weekends.  This results in less time in a specific place, and I find that this takes time away from everything.  I don’t like to feel like the clock is ticking while I am photographing.  And the smaller window of opportunity that is dictated by a shorter weekend makes that clock tick like a parade of Harleys going by!  With less time, success is more dependent on luck than creativity, and I don’t work so well when I am depending on luck.

Fall color along the Blue Ridge Parkway near Lone Bald Overlook, MP 432
Fall color along the Blue Ridge Parkway near Lone Bald Overlook, MP 432

So what does this all mean?  Well, it means several things.  First and foremost, I think it means that I need to do a better job of managing my time so that I have the freedom and flexibility I need to do the kind of photographic work I find most inspiring while also finding time to do the other things I love.  Photography and fine dining aren’t necessarily mutually exclusive.  Some times of the year they are, so I’ll need to work that out.  Sometimes it will mean a nice but late dinner, and sometimes it will mean cold chicken on the Parkway.  The other thing it means is possibly traveling less frequently but for longer periods of time.  And perhaps staying longer in one place instead of trying to see multiple locations and moving around constantly.  I generally shy away from what I refer to as the photographic “death march” and don’t do a lot of good photography while I’m driving down the road.  Give me a place to sit and chill for a while and I’m more likely to get inspired.

I’ve done some good work this past year and hope to do some more before it’s done.  This year has been a little weird for a lot of reasons, and I’m looking forward to settling back into my usual routine next year.  We’ll see where that leads, but I’m hoping it will lead to more fulfilling photography for me, and less of my whining about it to Kathy!

Sunset at Cowee Mountains Overlook, Blue Ridge Parkway MP 430
Sunset at Cowee Mountains Overlook, Blue Ridge Parkway MP 430

The Sidewalk Juggler

"The Sidewalk Juggler" performs at the Mountain Glory Festival in Marion, North Carolina
“The Sidewalk Juggler” performs at the Mountain Glory Festival in Marion, North Carolina

Kathy & I visited Marion, NC this past Saturday during their annual Mountain Glory Festival. This particular festival weekend is the only Saturday that  Bruce’s Fabulous Foods, one of our favorite eateries, is open.  The are typically a Monday-Friday lunch-only restaurant.  We get there as often as we can, but their schedule and ours don’t often overlap.

"The Sidewalk Juggler" performs at the Mountain Glory Festival in Marion, North Carolina
“The Sidewalk Juggler” performs at the Mountain Glory Festival in Marion, North Carolina

After our yummy lunch, we spent some time walking Main Street and checking out the vendors and performers.  We came across this guy, The Sidewalk Juggler, also known as Kyle Brown, who is a professional juggler.  This guy is good!

"The Sidewalk Juggler" performs at the Mountain Glory Festival in Marion, North Carolina
“The Sidewalk Juggler” performs at the Mountain Glory Festival in Marion, North Carolina

I think the thing that impressed me the most was the effortlessness with which he performed his act, smiling and joking with his audience all the time.  It’s clear that this is someone who truly loves his job.  This is evident not just from the constant smile on his face, but also because only love for your profession would inspire someone to work the number of hours that he obviously had to work in order to learn to do what he does.

"The Sidewalk Juggler" performs at the Mountain Glory Festival in Marion, North Carolina
“The Sidewalk Juggler” performs at the Mountain Glory Festival in Marion, North Carolina

This is hard work, and about as tough as it can get, I think.  Completely dependent on the generosity of others through their tips, his performance truly makes or breaks his livelihood. But talk about a portable skill!  This guy can work anyplace where there are people!  As I understand it from his Facebook page, his territory is ‘Western North Carolina.’  Check out his page and his YouTube videos.

"The Sidewalk Juggler" performs at the Mountain Glory Festival in Marion, North Carolina
“The Sidewalk Juggler” performs at the Mountain Glory Festival in Marion, North Carolina

My photos hardly do him justice, but I managed to capture a few frames that show the passion and concentration that this guy obviously has for his work.  I didn’t really appreciate it while I was taking the photos, but later on I thought about it and realized what a dedicated effort someone like this guy has to put into his profession.

"The Sidewalk Juggler" performs at the Mountain Glory Festival in Marion, North Carolina
“The Sidewalk Juggler” performs at the Mountain Glory Festival in Marion, North Carolina